Measure So You Can Manage

Having the right performance metrics helps you drive growth. Let me share with you six steps to implement effective measures to manage. Keeping a competitive edge in today’s marketplace requires ongoing investment in the transformation of your business. As Mark Twain said:  To stand still, is to fall behind.

1)      Clearly define your corporate goals

Without a clearly defined and documented strategy, it is impossible to set expectations and monitor performance. You can only manage what you can measure, so if you lack such a strategy, begin to brainstorm and evaluate opportunities for continued growth.  Understand what your weaknesses and strengths are and begin documenting so that when it is finalized, you can share it with your employees. You may think that everyone knows where you are going, but don’t’ assume.  No one has ever over communicated!

2)      Identify short-and long-term operational goals

Take your strategy and identify what you want to accomplish short-term (3 mos) and what needs a bit more time (12 mos).  This would include approaching the weaknesses and turn them into strengths. In operations you want to evaluate each step taken and whether it adds value or not to the final product or services.  Think lean here and optimize the process.

3)      Establish milestone, deliverables and tasks to support your goals

Now you may be ready for the roadmap.  Establish milestones, deliverables to be achieved and identify tasks and who performs them.  Now that you have documented and shared the strategy with your employees, it is important to listen to them and get their input.  Agree on goals, objectives and timetables.  Evaluate whether you have adequate resources, so you have a better chance of succeeding.

4)      Develop and implement metrics for all key activities

This is where the measuring starts. Make sure you engage your employees in setting performance metrics.  Here are some examples: Customer retention rate, supply chain rate of return, funnel conversion rate or call center support metrics. Be proactive and pay attention to leading indicators in your industry and pay less attention to lagging ones.  Clarify expectations with your executive team and staff, empower your employees and boost their engagement. Set some incentives in advance and make sure that all metrics are objective and not subjective.

5)      Monitor progress and make improvements as needed to stay on course

Now you have a roadmap in place that you can begin to monitor and manage. Your employees understand what is expected of them and how they can help the company grow.  Making a difference goes a long way in terms of talent retention.  There needs to be purpose and connection to the larger scheme as participation can give them a better understanding of how they personally can affect the business.

6)      Assess the effectiveness of metrics and modify if necessary

Close the loop by evaluating regularly how the metrics are working.  What is the assessment of your staff and how well are they adhering to these metrics?  Do you need to change them, are they giving you information that is meaningful to the future of your business?

Start the conversation today regarding how you can drive results with the right performance metrics. Transparency and accountability will be on your side as you seek a way to measure and manage. This is an ongoing process and of course, if your business changes, so do your performance metrics.

My book “Stop Compromising” has its own chapter (chapter 5) on this topic and explains ways to think about KPIs and performance metrics.

Let me know what KPIs and performance metrics have worked for you and what particular leading indicators you use for your roadmap.

 

Work Horizontally

Why working across departments adds value to your bottom line…Logo

As you grow your company, one of the pitfalls is that departments slowly but surely form into silos. Once that silo mentality is established, it is harder to break them down. A big piece of this is failing to recognize the importance of the interdependency of the various functions or departments. Working horizontally begins with the CEO who understands that the four business elements: Sales, operations, finance and the organization need to be on the same page in understanding the critical challenges of the company.

Collectively the four business elements are the engine that makes your business run. Each relies on the other three and if one is underperforming, it drags the others down, hence the interdependency. Working horizontally also implies that each business element understands what the other three need. Rather than compete internally for your budget dollars, lead them to a more collaborative approach where they view themselves as a service internally to the other departments. This is where the alignment of course comes in and is so important.

Clearly share and communicate your strategy with the department leaders. What are the opportunities to grow the business? Minimize risks and simultaneously increase the value of the business. Create a culture of continuous improvement.
How can each business element contribute to continuous and long-term improvement? The collaborative effort will help you uncover key business issues facing your company. Today’s market is swift and trends and competition change at a faster pace. Teamwork, communications and collaborations are essential to run your business in an agile fashion.

So begin your journey by focusing in transforming your business with Best Practices, step by step. This will be vital to your company’s success and profitability. For a start here are the Best Practices areas and questions to ask yourselves:

Organization: Culture set for change through leadership, culture and communications.
Have you clearly defined your mission, vision and supporting core values?
 Have you set key metrics to measure well-defined growth objectives?

Sales: Business market assessment and related risks in sales, marketing and business development.
Do you have a well-defined process for collecting and analyzing market                                    intelligence for potential growth opportunities?
 Do you gather customer requirements and measure customer satisfaction?

Operations: Growth and operations strategies in the areas of manufacturing, R&D, distribution and business services.
Do you have a written strategy for continuous improvement?
 Have you identified scalability issues of existing resources?

Finance: Your overall financial health in terms of finance, IT, risk management and capital raising.
Do you include in your financial reports an analysis of contribution margins for                      each of  your business segments?
 Does your finance team meet regularly with other departments to understand                        their needs?

Having procedures and policies in written form and shared with employees is another important step. Working horizontally in a collaborative manner will bring you great results. The era of silos is the thing of the past and letting each department run their own show will hurt your business. Starting with a benchmark assessment around best practices is a good start. Focusing on continuous improvements and empowering your employees to find efficiencies and drop anything that is not a value add to the customer will affect your bottom line in a positive way.

My book “Stop Compromising” has its own chapter on this topic and includes a benchmark assessment around the four business elements

Let me know what has worked for you in working across departments and in leading with a collaborative style! Did you see a direct result on your bottom line?

How to Create Value

Create ValueCreating and building value for your business is something you want to bring up high on your agenda and at an early stage of your business! Of course, but…“generating value is one of the most misunderstood tools of innovation” according to Fast Company. Why is that?

It may well be that it’s a misunderstood concept. So how do we define value creation? It’s aiming towards best practices with an ongoing focus on continuous improvement. Value creation is something you create both internally and externally with a heavy focus on customer services.

We also know that value creation directly correlates with the future valuation of the business. The external customer focus, something that a business owner relates to, is a necessity if you want to stay ahead of competition. However, the internal focus on value creation often falls short to the detriment of the future worth of the business.
So again, why is not more emphasis put into this part of running a business? In my experience, the CEO or business owner fails to make the time to work ON the business on a regular basis. Another reason may be that you don’t have enough resources. Maybe you are managing instead of leading and are running out of time. We also know, just like with any new technology or software, you have to invest in an upfront effort to plan and execute accordingly.

Improving organizational capabilities is an intangible aspect of value building. This activity examines its own leadership, talent, accountability, collaboration, speed, mindset and learning. It is a longer term view and effort. Getting your ducks lined up just before you are ready to sell, or transfer the business over to a family member, is going to be too late. Value creation happens over time and is continuous.

Let me share with you a big picture view and a starting point in how to address the Value Creation Process and how you might begin the process. Start with these three disciplines:

1) Operational Excellence
a. Efficiency
b. Streamline Operations
c. Supply Chain Management

2) Product & Services Oriented Leadership
a. Strong marketing and innovation
b. Dynamic Markets
c. Development – short time to market with high margins

3) Customer Intimacy
a. Exceed Customer Expectations
b. Tailor Products and Services
c. Deliver on time

Behind the three disciplines listed above are no doubt a lot of details. Let’s assume you have focused on customer intimacy (3) and it is well established. If not, create a benchmark or baseline around these activities and set a new standard so you remain competitive. Operational excellence (1) and leadership (2) is where many companies fall short. The art of business is to balance both external and internal value creation over time. Planning these activities is essential and will take some time and effort, however, no matter what your next stage, it will be worth your while.

I know as the leader of your company your demands are never ending. Begin your process one step at a time, just like writing a book, one chapter at a time. Begin to identify the low hanging fruit, something that is easy to fix and has the most positive outcome. Maybe it is shortening the number of phone rings for a receptionists. Achievable with immediate positive outcome for you, the employees as well as the client or vendor.

If you find your business experiencing a reduction in market share or have difficulty in keeping costs down and you are doing it all alone, consider an outside group of advisors by establishing an Advisory Board. More private companies are investing in creating an Advisory Board to help them with their strategic intent and guidance in how to plan and implement such goals.

I hope this is a good first step for you. Begin to work ON the business for at least 4 hours a week (in one block) and things will begin to happen. I will be speaking on the topic of Value Creation and Finding the Right Advisors in the next two weeks. You are more than welcome to attend.

My next blog will be on “Working Horizontally” discussing how to aim for organizational collaboration addressing the first discipline of this blog. If you want to receive these blogs directly, please click the button on Follow Rudi’s Blog.

Make comments on this blog or get in touch with me with any ideas or thoughts. You can find my contact information on my new website Stop-Compromising.

With gratitude, Rudi

I am back with a book!

Front Cover Book

A year ago I wrote a blog on Transform, Transition and Change.

I  have missed engaging with you, and yes, it has been a busy year!  Looking back I accomplished some of the goals I set and others are still incomplete! Maybe as a reader you affiliate with this dilemma?

All three actions above have affected me in a very positive way.  I am very proud to announce my newly published book. It is available on Amazon if you would like to purchase it.

It would mean a lot to me if you would take the time and write a review.  See Sample Quotes for Rudi you may want to incorporate at the bottom. Either way, send me a line or two with your feedback and what you think.

The book is written for CEO’s as an instructive business guide that leads them through the myth of finance. Providing a fiscal navigator to embrace operational finance more positively, it’s a holistic perspective to overcome typical business challenges and to experience sustainable growth.

The book now has a dedicated website Stop-Compromising where you can find more details about the book, speaking ideas and board role qualifications, all part of my transition to Business Advisor, Thought Leader and Board Member.

Let me know about your transformations, transitions and changes. Call for getting together over a cup of coffee or send me an email at                                                            stop-compromising@nextstagesolutions.com

Transform, Transition & Change

Transform ▲ Transition ▲ Change

by Rudi Scheiber-Kurtz

Words we are all very familiar with yet simultaneously love and hate!!  Everywhere you look you witness major shifts from status quo, whether it is politics, global warming or in fact our business models.

Mostly likely you will agree with me that the option to remain status quo is not a sustainable one.  One of my favorite words is A-G-I-L-I-T-Y because it hints at not standing still.

How are you going to transform, transition or change your business to provide your customers continuous value with optimal agility?

This January marks the 15th year of Next Stage Solutions offering strategic finance and operations to midmarket companies.  I am humbled at the hundreds of conversations with clients and prospects around sustainable growth, profit optimization and value creation.  I am proud to say that we have

The past 15 years have led me to a cross roads myself today, both professionally and personally.  I am in the middle of transforming. Transitioning and changing.  With that in mind I am working on the following:

  • Write a book/guide for CEOs on Value Creation. Each chapter provides hands-on tools and check lists for the busy CEO.  Looking to publish this spring
  • Transition NSS to an online digital platform for CEOs and CFOs to access finance and operational tools, proven methodologies, charts and guides
  • Develop a new online platform called Finance Beyond Numbers to establish a presence of forward-looking finance with a horizontal approach to leading
  • Lead XPX New England as the newly elected President of this 3 state chapter. It is an active and engaged group of professionals who help owners build valuable businesses and assist them in preparing and executing successful transitions.
  • Support my daughter Natasha with her brand new business that has the grand opening scheduled for January 16. It is a barre3 studio in Bedford, MA.  I have been taking her classes for over two years and I love the concept and work out. Words cannot describe how very proud I am of her for pulling this off single handedly.

Now that I have shared my five examples on transform, transition and change, what are yours? You may have heard me quote one of Yogi Berra sayings:  “If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.”

I imagine that you do not want to be in that situation, we all want some kind of predictability.  More important than ever is for you to be WORKING ON the business, this way you have a chance to get to where you want to be.

Make it part of your culture to transform, transition and change and agility will be your friend.

 

 

Linear Solutions Not Adequate

This week’s Boston Globe article by Jeffrey Sachs “Beyond the Bottom Line” makes an attempt for the reader to understand better the complexity of our Federal Budget.  Policy debates, he states “are designed to obscure rather than reveal the truth.”  I am truly fascinated with his view and outline for change, an out of the box view, yet so essential if we want to make real change in how we run our businesses and governments. I know, it is easier said than done as change is ever so difficult.  It does take a different mindset to leadership that is both nonlinear thinking and a bit outside the norm.

This reminded me of an effort from 12 years ago, that I am still very passionate about today.  My friend and neighbor Ravi, a retired CEO of a large alternative energy company, and I discussed the services of our local transportation system of small buses called ‘Lexpress’.  The inefficiencies around fiscal ineptness and ridership let us to investigate further as we began a conversation with the local town officials on a volunteer basis.

bus  We gathered all the business intelligence available to us on current costs and revenues. We found 3 problems facing the sustainability of these services:

  1. 1. Services offered from 7am – 6pm nonstop only had two time slots a day where demand was extremely high, that of beginning and ending of the school day. Students in fact were often left behind because the buses were full, making parents quite upset.
  2. Low to NO demand the rest of the day, as buses were running around town empty.  Our diligence discovered that only about 2% of elderly in town used ‘Lexpress’ in addition to an occasional rider. Very different of what town officials estimated.
  3. Annual loss of $350K to the town, including state grants.

Regularly the funding of this service would come up for discussion and eventually get funded again.  Ravi and I looked at alternative models in how the town could serve its customers better and with a lesser fiscal burden.  We talked with a local taxi service to offer a point-to-point service for a flat, slightly subsidized fee from the same state grant, and one that elderly actually would use.  We proposed to double the am and pm runs for student and then recommended ‘Lexpress’ for other services outside of town. Our financial model predicted a reduction of loss by 85% or $300K to a $50,000 per year loss based on existing usage, not including the huge potential uptick in ridership to bring it to break-even or even a slight profit.

You see where I am going, long story short, they literally laughed at us and told us not to come back.  Today and 12 years later the buses are still running EMPTY with accumulated loss of $5Million, not nothing for a small town. Adjacent towns implemented similar on-demand services that we recommended which have been very popular.

Now, moving over to your private business!  You could not possibly run with a loss over a long period of time, eventually it catches up with you.  What are some of your processes and customer needs that have been neglected simply by doing it the same old way?  Should you take the time to evaluate your processes and whether every step is a value add step?  Have you been working with your customers the same old way or could you improve in how you serve them better, benefitting both sides?  We indeed get stuck in the way we do things and change is often viewed as a threat and unattainable.

However, automation and robotics are here to stay.  The Wall Street Journal today has a great article on Target and the long term investment they are making in hiring a Massachusetts company Symbotic, LLC  in setting up a new distribution center.  Autonomous robots that travel unattached within the storage space.  According to the article, “distribution-center labor costs will be reduced by 80% operating in warehouses that are 25-40% smaller”.  With other words, 100 robots will replace 20 humans who currently walk 20 miles and lift 50,000 pounds during one shift.  This is the new future.

Could and would you want to look for such savings in your business? In our experience working with midmarket businesses, we found that a good first step is to move the business from an annual budget process to a Rolling Forecast.  This alone can save you up to 50% of budget preparation time. This is a first step in changing the culture and the mindset and a Rolling Forecast can be the culprit of looking for ongoing solutions in running your business faster, better and cheaper.

budget

Let me encourage you to step outside the box.  Call us to start the conversation in how we may partner with you to take you through a transition.  You may be amazed what you and your employees come up with and the real changes you can begin making.  You know darn well, if you don’t, the competition will.  The complexity that Jeffrey Sachs is talking about may be “outside the political mainstream” but not for you, the private midmarket business who must be looking into the future for sustainable growth.  Simple linear solutions will no longer be good enough.

Every CEO Faces Agility Issues

Our 3rd CEO Leadership Event of our 3-part Series at the Lanam Club, Andover

Wed, May 18th from 12noon – 2pm- JOIN US!

HOW DO SMART COMPANIES GROW?

What can we learn from fast growth businesses and why you need to know?  What is the fundamental path to growth in a fast paced business environment? Here are the 3 Reasons:

  1. The economic picture will continue to change, both internationally and nationally, affecting all businesses small and large. EVERY business needs to understand how to become more adaptive and agile against this volatility to survive.
  2. How do fast growth businesses adapt daily to these external changes and how do they keep their businesses agile? The CEOs will describe the different stages of growth and how it affects their culture; how they go about finding the right people, a challenge we all face.
  3. Come and hear how the digitized world helped them and what YOU can apply to your business today!  An industry agnostic approach.

REGISTER TODAY TO HAVE A SEAT AT THE TABLE!

PANELISTS:

CloudLock   Gil Zimmermann, CEO & Co-Founder, CloudLock

Mobiquity   Bill Seibel, past CEO, Mobiquity

CTP   Chris Greendale, Founder & CEO, Cloud Technology Partner

MODERATOR:            Rudi Scheiber-Kurtz, Founder & CEO, Next Stage Solutions, Inc

WHERE:  The Lanam Club, 260 N Main Street, Andover, MA 01810

Register Today!

Rudi Scheiber-Kurtz of Next Stage Solutions, Inc. | 617. 449. 7728

Andy Snider of Snider Associates | 617. 947. 1170

SniderNSS